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1/2" Cash-Valve Reducing Valve - 20-150 PSI

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$106.59 - $329.95
{{resource("/ProductPage/Labels/List")}} $168.00 - $529.44

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Count on industry standard cash-valve.

Cash-valves are used to control the flow of steam and oil and not air or water. Made from iron. Available in a variety of sizes with a PSI of 20-150. Manufacturers warranty applies.

Features

  • Used to control the flow of steam/oil
  • Made of long lasting and durable iron
  • Available in a variety of sizes

Product Specifications

Units: Each
Material: Iron, Bronze Piston/Cylinder
Special Instructions: Used for Steam only.
Brand: Cash-Valve
Size / Dimension: 1/2"; PSI 20-150
Steam is leaking out the small pin hole at the top of my reducing valve. Can I plug this hole?
Anonymous
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No, the hole is for determining a diaphragm leak. If steam is leaking out the hole than the diaphragm has ruptured and the regulator will need to be replaced or repaired. Ruptured diaphragms are caused from over-taxing the regulators. The cleaner can reduce the stress and prolong the life of the regulator by avoiding running multiple pieces of equipment off one regulator.
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Why is it important to use a strainer when installing a reducing valve?
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The screen in the reducing valve acts like an internal strainer protecting all the vital parts. Of course it doesn’t do any good if you don’t clean it from time to time. An external strainer is much simpler to service than taking apart a reducing valve. When the screen in the regulator valve gets partially clogged it limits the flow of steam out of the valve therefore taxing the valve and it cannot maintain pressure.
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How do you know where the inlet hole is on the Cash Valve Reducing Valve?
Anonymous
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The inlet is where the red nut is.
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Do the Cash Reducing Valves have CSA listing?
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They do NOT have a CSA listing.
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How can I tell which size valve I need?
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The size of our valves are printed above the WSP rating on the valve.
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Why is my Reducing Valve making a rattling sound?
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Typically, this would occur is the demand on the regulator exceeded its capacity. If the equipment requirement is exceeding the valves psi/hour capacity, the valve becomes unstable and the piston rattles. The only way to fix would be to increase the inlet pressure or use a larger regulator.
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Can your reducing valves work on air as well as steam?
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No.
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Do you carry and sell rebuilt valves?
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No, we do not sell any valves that have been rebuilt.
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On the Cash Reducing Valve, how can you tell which end is the inlet and which is the outlet?
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To find the inlet, turn the unit over. The inlet will be marked “inlet” and there will be arrows pointing out which way the steam should flow.
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What are the Cash Reducing Valves preset at?
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50 PSI
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Can Reducing Valves be installed vertically and horizontally?
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They should only be installed horizontally.
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What could be a reason that the pressure reducing valves’ pressure starts to rise higher that the specified pressure?
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This could be due to a few reasons: 1. The reducing valve and the reducing valves seat may be clogged with foreign matter. Take apart the valve and clean. Clean the valve seat, and make sure it doesn’t need to be replaced. 2. The by-pass valve my be leaking- repair or replace the by-pass valve. 3. Check the sensing port located in the outlet side of the reducing valve. Make sure that is not clogged with debris.
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What does a reducing valve do?
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A reducing valve is put on the steam line to reduce a high pressure to a lower operating pressure.
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What does WSP refer to?
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WSP stands for “working steam pressure”.
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What does WOG stand for?
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WOG stands for “water, oil, and gas (steam)”.
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What does PSI refer to?
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PSI is a unit of measurement. It stands for pounds per square inch.
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Does Cleaner’s Supply carry pressure gauge reducing valve installations kits?
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We carry these kits in 3 different sizes. They include the pressure gauge, a nipple and reducing tee, a “pig-tail” pipe, and a shut off ball valve. The sizes we carry are ½” (RV10), ¾” (RV20), and a 1” (RV30).
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Why would the reducing valve make strange noises?
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This problem could be cause by a few things. If the reducing ratio is larger than 10:1, there could be an abnormal sound. Reduce the pressure is 2 stages, so as not to shock the system. The noise heard might be “water hammer”; it is suggested that a steam trap be installed before the valve. If there is a quick responding valve near the reducing valve, the quick responding valve should be as far away as possible from the reducing valve. And if the valve is oversized, it is important to verify the sizing and change the valve if needed.
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What could be a reason that the reducing valves will not obtain the proper pressure?
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This could be due to a few reasons: 1. Make sure that the inlet pressure is not too high or too low, adjust the pressure to the appropriate level. 2. Is the valve's size smaller that what is required? If so, change the valve to the correct size. 3.Another reason may be that the adjustment wasn’t appropriate. Readjust the valve: Open the valve on the drip leg, this allows the bucket steam trap to drain condensate. Close the gate valves before and after reducing valve, slowly open the bypass valve to allow steam to blow through the bypass line. Loosen the jam nut at the top of the valve. Slowly open the inlet side’s gate valve to the fully open position, and partially open the outlet side’s gate valve, so that only a small amount of steam can pass. Turn the adjustment screw clockwise until the desired pressure is obtained. Open the outlet’s gate valve so it is in the fully opened position. Adjust the pressure again after the system has stabilized. Turning the adjustment screw clockwise will increase the pressure, turning it counter-clockwise will decrease the pressure. Tighten the jam nut to secure the adjustment screw in place. 4. Make sure the strainer on the inlet side is not clogged with debris. Check the strainer and clean its screen. 5. If all of these steps have been checked, the pressure gauge may be out of order, and should be replaced.
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Why would a reducing valve have a “shaking” sound?
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The shaking may be due to the reducing valve being undersized. For instance a ½” valve would allow for 187 lbs. per hour. The ¾” would allow for 225 lbs. per hour. And the 1” would allow for 353 lbs. per hour. If the valve is too small and there is a large steam flow coming through the valve, the steam gets “crunched” and agitates the valve. Make sure the valve is tightened down, and that the valve is the proper size.
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Can you adjust the pressure on a pressure reducing valve (RV or CRV) when the steam is on?
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The answer is yes.
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